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Thread: Andray Blatche Is A Joke

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    Default Andray Blatche Is A Joke

    There is no one on the entire team I hate more right now than Andray Blatche.

    The dude is a CLOWN. He has less passion for basketball than Kwame Brown. When Michael Wilbon makes a claim, he knows what he's talking about...and every single article he makes reference to how Blatche would rather be at parties than playing the game of basketball.

    How damn obvious is it? The dude is like 7 feet and gets FIVE REBOUNDS A GAME as a starting center. Dominic McGuire and Caron Butler OUTREBOUND HIM as starting TWOS AND THREES.

    He put on like twenty pounds of fat in the offseason. He's completely out of shape and is always the last person coming down the court. Apparently, team staff have forever been trying to get him on a consistent strengthening and weight-training program but he hasn't done ****.

    His weak-ass finger-rolls around the basket drive me nuts. So do his outside jumpers. You're SEVEN FEET TALL AND CAN JUMP OUT OF THE GYM. DUNK THE ****ING BALL!!!

    It seems like the only thing he's improved since he got here is his free throw shooting...which is goddamn great, considering he takes TWO FREE THROWS A GAME and never takes the ball strong enough to draw any contact.

    Why we made Ed Tapscott interim HC is beyond me. The man is Director of Player Development, and our development here has been ATROCIOUS. Blatche is a talented monster who is a fat lazy lard. Pecherov has gone nowhere. Young doesn't seem much different from last year, and was expected to step up on both ends. McGee and Crittenton he doesn't even play.

    Blatche epitomizes what is wrong with this team though. We gave him what, a 5 year, $15 million contract based on nothing but him having loads of potential, and after getting shot, being continuously lamented by his teammates for not going all-out, this is how he rewards us????

    If I was coach, I would tell Andray Blatche he's not playing in a game the rest of the season, and will be suspended indefinitely until he gets himself in suitable shape. That means a) being able to run up and down the floor, b) bulking up and not getting thrown out of the way by every player in the league, and c) developing some mental toughness, enough to learn how to take a charge, DUNK THE ****ING BALL, and not whine and sulk about coming out of games.

    THIS IS YOUR JOB. If I got paid $3 million plus a year to be a basketball player, I would not do anything else. Like Gilbert, I would live in the gym, do absolutely everything I can to get better, and not be satisfied until I win.

    I think some of the guys on our team are like that. Caron and Twan for sure. Songaila is a professional. Andray Blatche seems perfectly fine with being Darius Songaila for his career though, a possible 9th man on a playoff team, when IF THE MAN PUT SOME EFFORT IN, HE COULD BE A DAMN KEVIN GARNETT.

    It's time to get hard on Blatche and kick this loser off the team until he shows some more commitment than Kwame Brown. His conditioning is atrocious; I feel like I'm in better shape than him, and getting 5 rebounds a game in your 4th year as a starting center is just putrid..it reflects a lack of preparation, which leads to failure, as well as a lack of any heart or desire out on the court.

    "IF IT IS TO BE, IT IS UP TO ME." Someone tell Andray Blatche if he ever wants to be worth a **** as a basketball player, he better get his ass to work. And someone teach the man he's not a 6'7 SF...his outside shot will never be consistent enough to keep him in the game there, and as much as he hates it he's a SEVEN-FOOT-CENTER. Bulk up, and learn how to rebound, dunk the ball, and not get pushed around by bigs out there.
    Last edited by WizSkinsO's; 01-08-2009 at 04:33 PM.

  2. #2
    MVP skiNs's Avatar
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    He's a PF, not a center. He's played C the past few seasons first due to Etan's heart troubles and Haywood's injury.

    His niche was a good shooting, quick, agile PF that could put the ball on the floor. Over the past year or so he's suddenly been thrust into the "you must now be a big man and put on 30 pounds develop a back-to-the-basket game instantly". Give him time. Yes, it frustrates all of us that he doesn't go up hard and dunk it when he can, but he's not used to it.

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    I can tell you are upset and many share your opinion. I will stay out for the time being but they hammered him today on ESPN radio basically echoing what you just posted
    RedeemTeam- "wtf. **** you elton brand. **** kind of name is elton."

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    3 Point Specialist DCTeemz's Avatar
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    Amen. 1 rebound last night vs Raptors who are the worst rebounding team. Any 7 footer who gets 1 rebound should be ashamed of themselves. Total waste of talent. I would rather see Javale Mcgee who at least plays hard (Even though he has no idea what he is doing out there ).

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    Quote Originally Posted by DCTeemz View Post
    Amen. 1 rebound last night vs Raptors who are the worst rebounding team. Any 7 footer who gets 1 rebound should be ashamed of themselves. Total waste of talent. I would rather see Javale Mcgee who at least plays hard (Even though he has no idea what he is doing out there ).
    Yeah, in my rant I completely forgot that that was what aggravated me the most.

    HOW DO YOU GET ONE REBOUND AGAINST ANDREA BARGNANI?!!!

    Absolutely pathetic. I could do that.

    For the person who said he's a PF, whatever. PFs are supposed to rebound the ball too. You're 7 feet tall. You get more than 5 rebounds a game. Antawn Jamison gets 10, because he's strong, he's built his body up over the years, and he has HEART...he wants the basketball...Andray Blatche is a pansy.

    Put the ball on the ground? Are you kidding me? He could school everybody and dribble the ball back in HS when he was playing against a bunch of unathletic white guys. Have you seen him try that in the NBA??? He's a BLACK HOLE...he turns the ball over every single time he does that. He's a dummy...easiest thing to learn is to dunk the damn ball in the basket.

    How ****ing hard can dunking be? Watch video of Dwight Howard. In practice, slam dunk the ball 100 times consecutively. Condition yourself to go up strong and SLAM it, not FINGERROLL it.

    Admin, I would love to hear that radio clip if you know where to find it.

    This movement needs to get a voice and be brought to Andray's attention. He should honestly not be allowed to play for this team if he doesn't work at his game. I don't want Kwame 2.0 taking minutes from the guys who care like McGee.

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    Should Andray Blatche ever come across this thread in his lifetime, I would like to impart words of wisdom from the great Michael Phelps, from his book "No Limits." I guarantee you Andray could not survive one of Phelps' workouts. He probably works 500X harder than Blatche.

    Pg. 5-6: "Bob [Bowman]'s philosophy is rather simple: We do the things other people can't, or won't, do. Bob's expectations are simple, too. It's like the quote he had on the whiteboard one day at practice a few months before the Games. It comes from a business book but in sports it's the same: "In business, words are words, explanations are explanations, promises are promises, but only performance is reality."

    "Bob is exquisitely demanding. But it is with him that I learned this essential truth: Nothing is impossible. And this: Because nothing is impossible, you have to dream big dreams; the bigger, the better."

    "So many people along the way, whatever it is you aspire to do, will tell you it can't be done. But all it takes is imagination.

    You dream. You plan. You reach.

    There will be obstacles. There will be doubters. There will be mistakes.

    But with hard work, with belief, with confidence and trust in yourself and those around you, there are no limits. Perseverance, determination, commitment, and courage--those things are real. The desired for redemption drives you. And the will to succeed, it's everything."

    Pg. 32-33: (Phelps had broken his wrist.) The accident, I said, had made me refocus on 2008, which was going to be the biggest year of my life, and my goals.

    I told a pack of reporters who were there, "If I could live in a bubble right now, I probably would, so I couldn't get hurt, I couldn't get in trouble, I couldn't do anything. Just swim, eat, and sleep. That's it."

    Pg. 69: "Bob emphasized sportsmanship, accountability, responsibility. The program placed an extraordinary premium on attitude. It was said, over and again, that the single most important factor in anything we do, and particularly in this endeavor, was this: What is your attitude?

    At [Phelps' swim center], one of the slogans, and Bob had a million slogans, was "Attitude, Action, Achievement." That was the order in which you could expect things to happen. You could see every day's practice as an ordeal. Or you could see it as adventure."

    "Bob also used to give a talk that went something like this: Are you going to wait until after you win your gold medal to have a good attitude? No. You're going to do it beforehand. You have to have the right mental attitude, and go from there. You're going to be an Olympic champion in attitude long before there's a gold medal around your neck."

    Pg. 64: "You have to be mentally tough to go through it. If you're not mentally tough, you're not learning what he's teaching you. Growing up, I used to tell Bob when he would order a set that would make my eyes widen, I can't do that. He would say, there's a difference between 'can't' and 'won't.' Maybe you won't do that, he would then say. But you can.

    If you say 'can't', you're restricting what you can do or ever will do. You can use your imagination to do whatever you want. 'Can't', he would say, that's a tough word.
    ...
    It's not a lie that I wanted to beat the record. It's not a secret. I just wasn't going to come out and say it. Why would I? The only person who could help me accomplish my goals was [my coach.] No offense to anyone in the media, but is a reporter going to help me swim faster? Help me win any medal of any kind? That's why I kept everything to myself. It wasn't necessary to share my goals with anyone but Bob. So I didn't do it.

    Pg. 108-109: "Bob's coaching philosophy can be distilled as follows: Set your goals high. Work conscientiously, every day, to achieve them.

    Among the many authors Bob has read, he likes to cite the motivational speaker Earl Nightingale, who survived the attack on Pearl Harbor on the USS Arizona, then went on to a career in broadcasting. The way Bob tells it, Nightingale's work revealed the one thing that's common to all successful people: They make a habit of doing things that unsuccessful people don't like to do.

    That's it. That's Bob's game. His drill, while sometimes fabulously complex, is really quite simple--make a habit of doing things others weren't willing to do.

    There are plenty of people with some amount of talent. Are you willing to go farther, work harder, be more committed and dedicated than anyone else?

    If others were inclined to take Sunday off, well, that just meant we might be one-seventh better.

    For five years, from 1998 to 2003, we did not believe in days off. I had one because of a snowstorm, two more due to the removal of wisdom teeth. Christmas? See you at the pool. Thanksgiving? Pool. Sponsor obligations? Work them out around practice time.

    On September 11, I reported to afternoon practice at Meadowbrook. Bob began the session, which ultimately ended early, with a defiant pep talk. We don't stop for snow, for rain, for a flood, and we for sure aren't going to stop for terrorists, he declared.

    During those years, Bob figured, counting meets, that I could work in the pool about 550 times each year. In all, between Sydney and Athens, about 2,200 times, enough to swim somewhere around 9,000 miles.

    I loved it when people who have no clue--mostly guys I knew from high school who had played other sports--would say to me, swimming can't be that hard. Okay, I would say, why don't you come to our workout for a day?

    I knew I could get by in whatever workout anyone else might have...I guarantee you, I would say, there is not a chance you would make it through even my warm-up."

    Pg. 110: "Bob uses a saying that has come to define the way he and I approach these grueling blocks of training. When we practice long and hard, he would say, we're depositing money into the bank. We need to deposit enough so that, when we make a large withdrawal, we have enough funds to do so.

    Pg. 122:
    "The most puzzling thing abut that [poor] 200 final in Montreal is that it came two days after a disastrous 400 free prelim; I finished eighteenth of fifty-seven swimmers, and failed for the first time in years to advance to the final. In my 400 prelim, I had been third in my heat at the turn, then faded to seventh. Looking at the scoreboard, I couldn't believe it. I still can't. I am at a loss to explain why it happened. It just did.

    It was a lesson I would rather not have been reminded of, that racing at a world-class level takes everything you've got, and you have to bring it each and every day...

    Every day thereafter, at the pool or in the weight room in Ann Arbor, I felt the sting. My response to that, the work that losing would spur me to put in, that was something I could control. Ian Thorpe's willingness to keep swimming: that I had no control over.

    The work I was putting in jumped to a new level."

    Pg. 131:
    "When it comes down to it, when the time comes to focus and be mentally prepared, I can do whatever it takes to get there, in any situation.

    I can because I know this, too: At the highest level of sports, and especially at the Olympics, you have to expect that everyone competing against you has physical talent. So: How do you channel peak performance into championship performance? You have to be mentally tough, that's how.

    How do you get to be mentally tough? You have to train your mind just like you train your body.

    Unleash your imagination. Work hard. Embrace obstacles, difficulties, and mistakes.

    Nothing in life is easy. You can't wake up one day, announce you're going to do something, and expect it to be a success. At least not consistently. You have to put time and energy and whatever you've got into it. You have to want to do it, want it badly.

    That's the point that perhaps some people who say they want something, whatever that something is, don't fully understand. A lot of swimmers I trained with said they wanted to achieve something great but didn't truly put time, energy, dedication, and heart into it.

    I put time, energy, dedication, heart, and soul into it.

    If I wasn't in the right mood to practice, I got myself into that right mood."

    Pg. 145:
    "I set out to break [a] record. I did not get there, and after the race I put my head in my hands. At that moment, I was only beginning to understand what not training diligently in the butterfly would yield. Bob directed my training sets, of course, but when it came to the fly he would every now and then give me a choice of doing extra butterfly sets at the close of practice. I usually said, no, thanks. It was, after all, my best stroke. At the end of a workout, I was genuinely tired.

    Bob had let me learn the hard way that there was no substitute for the hard work it would always take to get better.

    Later that summer, at the Pan Pacs in Yokohama, Malchow beat me in the same race. If I needed an even more blunt reminder, now I had it.

    I hated losing.

    I also hated hearing Bob say, "I told you so."

    After that, Bob gave me punishing butterfly sets. Through Athens, I devoured them. That is what Bob wanted--my best effort...Bob expects as many consecutive days of first-rate training as possible.

    Bob also, quite deliberately, would arrange practices, schedules, workouts, drills, whatever he could think of, around the idea of being uncomfortable.

    His thinking always has been to put his swimmers through every scenario possible. You're tired; you feel you can't move; you're truly hurting. That's when he would throw down especially hard sets. Bob wanted to gauge not only how I felt under pressure but, more important, how I responded under pressure. If I could deal with whatever it was when I was tired, I could deal with anything that came my way. Because that is the real definition of a champion, someone who can deal with any obstacle that comes his or her way, can deal with any situation at any given point.

    Michael Jordan was so sick with the stomach flu before game five of the 1997 NBA Finals that he hardly slept the night before. He was exhausted and dehydrated. He played 44 minutes and scored 38 points, and his Bulls won the game by two points.

    A champion can deal with any kind of pressure."

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    MVP NoVAwizfan's Avatar
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    Blatche = Stevenson for me at this point.....except everytime we all seem to get down on Blatche he proves us wrong for a game or two, then its right back to being a bum... so i dunno.

    consistently inconsistent......
    Last edited by NoVAwizfan; 01-08-2009 at 05:20 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by NoVAwizfan View Post
    Blatche = Stevenson for me at this point.....except everytime we all seem to get down on Blatche he proves us wrong for a game or two, so i dunno.
    Yeah. He's a career all-star against the Thunder. The NBA is a game of consistency. The greats bring it every night, minus maybe 5-10 games a year. The bums like Blatche BRING IT maybe 5-10 nights a year.

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    3 Point Specialist DCTeemz's Avatar
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    Even Kwame Brown had a few good games every now and then. He needs to show consistency of effort. There should never be any question about effort. Effort should be consistent. It is hard work to consistently go into traffic and rebound the ball night in and night out. It takes hard work to get into game shape and make yourself a better player. I am not seeing the effort it takes to be a professional. I am sure that the management of this team is seeing the same thing. They signed him to a contract as an investment in his talent, but if he does not give the effort, he will be gone in short order. I would guess that he has the rest of this season to show some consistency of effort. There is going to be quite a house cleaning in the off season. Dixon, Stevenson, and Thomas are all likely to be gone. It is up to Blatche whether or not he is on that bus.

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    Old Meets New RedeemTeam's Avatar
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    I don't know how to analyze blatche, i kind of think he is a live in the moment type of player, but doesn't reach those fiery moments enough. the only time you really ever see him with confidence and "swagger"(hate that word now) is when he is doing good, but so many other times, he seems like a puzzled little kid with no expression on his face. im sure if you read through a couple of the past game threads, you will come across a few of my post that point out how much i hate it that he is seven feet, but wants to shoot jumpers(even if he makes them) and dribble like a point guard. I get tired of the fingerrolls also, and im like why does mcguire want to rebound and dunk the ball more than you. His blocks have gone down, but thats understandable(sort of) since we don't have haywood downlow to anchor our D and send people blatche's way anymore. I love the fact about him that he wants to showcase his talent, but i hate that he thinks the best way of doing that is getting a rebound, dribbling the ball the length of the court with a few okay moves, and either turning the ball over, getting called for a charge, or just completely missing an opportunity for another teammate to score.

    AT least with mcgee, you don't see him trying to play too far out of his range every game. He jumps at every fake to block the shot and gets caught, but at least he is trying for the block. sometimes he gets the ball around 15 feet and does a jumper, but his form is not bad at all, and he tries to rebound, even if he gets pushed around in the paint by bigger players. difference is that if we spent 4 years on mcgee, like we have on blatche, this wiz team could be really special in a few years.

    I think blatche may be trying to audition for other teams sometimes and doesn't really care about washington anymore, which if its true is despicable, seeing as though we took a chance on him, and even gave him a second contract. im thinking that he could care less about how many games we win, because he probably wants to be in a different team next season. well, i hope somebody gets take him, i heard dallas has wanted him the past few years. give me brandon bass's effort anyday over blatche's.
    Redeem Team 2.0

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